medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

John Webber
The Tahitian Princess Poedua
England/Tahiti, 1777
National Maritime Museum, London
[x]
Another artwork from the last voyage of Captain Cook. Wikipedia gives more evidence of what an a**hole he was: 
Poedua (circa 1758 – ?) was a Raiatea princess, daughter of Orea (Orio), King of Ulietea. She was taken hostage together with father, brother, and husband during the third voyage of James Cook in exchange of two sailors that deserted onto the island. The hostages were enticed on board the HMS Discovery, imprisoned until Orea secured the return of the deserters.
For many contemporaries John Weber’s portrait of Poedua epitomized the sensual image of the South Sea maiden.

I truly hope the viewers of this painting pay attention to the last line there…hypersexualized images of women of color from around the world served as advertisements for colonialism targeted toward European men for centuries. Eckhout’s series of Brazilian portraits were commissioned for the same purpose; there is little doubt that this was the reason for Webber’s inclusion on the voyage.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

John Webber

The Tahitian Princess Poedua

England/Tahiti, 1777

National Maritime Museum, London

[x]

Another artwork from the last voyage of Captain Cook. Wikipedia gives more evidence of what an a**hole he was: 

Poedua (circa 1758 – ?) was a Raiatea princess, daughter of Orea (Orio), King of Ulietea. She was taken hostage together with father, brother, and husband during the third voyage of James Cook in exchange of two sailors that deserted onto the island. The hostages were enticed on board the HMS Discovery, imprisoned until Orea secured the return of the deserters.

For many contemporaries John Weber’s portrait of Poedua epitomized the sensual image of the South Sea maiden.

I truly hope the viewers of this painting pay attention to the last line there…hypersexualized images of women of color from around the world served as advertisements for colonialism targeted toward European men for centuries. Eckhout’s series of Brazilian portraits were commissioned for the same purpose; there is little doubt that this was the reason for Webber’s inclusion on the voyage.

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo
[x], [x], [x], [x]
Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)
As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.
She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.
After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.
So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.
Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Fe Del Mundo

[x], [x], [x], [x]

Fe Del Mundo (1911-2011) was a Filipina pediatrician, and the first woman to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. (They mistook her gender on the application form, but her credentials were so good they decided not to send her back. She may also have been the first Asian to attend.)

As a child, she’d already decided she wanted to be a doctor for the poor - three of her eight siblings died when they were kids. After her medical studies, she returned home to the Philippines, only to be plunged into the devastation of the Japanese military occupation of World War Two.

She volunteered to care for kids in the internment camp and set up a hospital there, earning her the nickname “The Angel of San Tomás”. She ended up heading a new children’s hospital during the war, that later evolved into a full-scale medical centre.

After the war, she opened the country’s first pediatric hospital, did pioneering research into infectious diseases like dengue fever, advocated family planning (controversial due to her Catholicism) and invented a bamboo incubator to be used in rural villages. And she went on working as a pediatrician well into her nineties.

So don’t mess with women in STEM. There’s every chance they will outlive you.

Wikipedia on Fe Del Mundo

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Merit-Ptah
Art by J Bea Young
[x]
Lots of sites will tell you that Merit-Ptah (c. 2700 BCE) is the first woman we know by name in the sciences. She was the Chief Physician to the royal family in Ancient Egypt, and her name and picture appear on a tomb in the necropolis at Saqqara.
The truth is, she’s the first person we know by name in the sciences, male or female. The engineer, architect and physician Imhotep, called "the Father of Medicine", is dated as living from 2650 to 2600 BCE.
To be fair, the dates do seem to be under dispute. But there’s no reason not to go around telling people that the world’s first recorded doctor was probably an African woman.
(I wanted to find the original tomb art, but there are loads of different generic pictures associated with Merit-Ptah’s name on Google Images… can any friendly Egyptologists confirm which one’s legit?)

[mod note] As far as I know, there are no depictions of Merit-Ptah herself, but someone may be able to find an image of her tomb.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Merit-Ptah

Art by J Bea Young

[x]

Lots of sites will tell you that Merit-Ptah (c. 2700 BCE) is the first woman we know by name in the sciences. She was the Chief Physician to the royal family in Ancient Egypt, and her name and picture appear on a tomb in the necropolis at Saqqara.

The truth is, she’s the first person we know by name in the sciences, male or female. The engineer, architect and physician Imhotep, called "the Father of Medicine", is dated as living from 2650 to 2600 BCE.

To be fair, the dates do seem to be under dispute. But there’s no reason not to go around telling people that the world’s first recorded doctor was probably an African woman.

(I wanted to find the original tomb art, but there are loads of different generic pictures associated with Merit-Ptah’s name on Google Images… can any friendly Egyptologists confirm which one’s legit?)

[mod note] As far as I know, there are no depictions of Merit-Ptah herself, but someone may be able to find an image of her tomb.

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Juan Luna
Self-portrait
Italy, Rome (1879)
National Museum of the Philippines
[x]
Juan Luna y Novicio (1857 – 1899) was one of the first Filipino artists to become recognised internationally. He lived in Europe from 1877 to 1894, creating historical paintings and sculptures, even becoming a friend of the King of Spain.
In 1884, he won First Prize at the Exposición Nacional de Bellas Artes in Madrid for his painting of Roman gladiators. Coincidentally, it was another Filipino painter, Félix Resurrección Hidalgo (1855-1933), who won the Second Prize! 
Their success was hailed by Filipino reformists as a sign that despite being seen as a “barbarian race”, they could paint better than the Spanish who colonised them.

Juan Luna
Spoliarium
Italy, Rome (1884)
Oil on poplar
National Museum of the Philippines
[x]

Félix Resurrección Hidalgo
The Christian Virgins Exposed to the Populace / Las virgenes Cristianas expuestas al populacho
Spain (1884)
Metropolitan Museum of the Philippines
[x]

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Juan Luna

Self-portrait

Italy, Rome (1879)

National Museum of the Philippines

[x]

Juan Luna y Novicio (1857 – 1899) was one of the first Filipino artists to become recognised internationally. He lived in Europe from 1877 to 1894, creating historical paintings and sculptures, even becoming a friend of the King of Spain.

In 1884, he won First Prize at the Exposición Nacional de Bellas Artes in Madrid for his painting of Roman gladiators. Coincidentally, it was another Filipino painter, Félix Resurrección Hidalgo (1855-1933), who won the Second Prize! 

Their success was hailed by Filipino reformists as a sign that despite being seen as a “barbarian race”, they could paint better than the Spanish who colonised them.

Juan Luna

Spoliarium

Italy, Rome (1884)

Oil on poplar

National Museum of the Philippines

[x]

Félix Resurrección Hidalgo

The Christian Virgins Exposed to the Populace / Las virgenes Cristianas expuestas al populacho

Spain (1884)

Metropolitan Museum of the Philippines

[x]

fuckyeahtattoos:

This was done by Christina Hock at Dolorosa Tattoo in Studio City, California. Inspired by a portrait hanging in the elevator of the haunted mansion at disneyland

fuckyeahtattoos:

This was done by Christina Hock at Dolorosa Tattoo in Studio City, California. Inspired by a portrait hanging in the elevator of the haunted mansion at disneyland

Xiang Fei Altered Copy: Mind=Blown

medievalpoc:

rainbowrosefae submitted to medievalpoc:

I saw your post about Xiang Fei and, as a woman and a Chinese person, found it interesting. I did a little digging, and found a higher resolution version:

香妃戎装像 -- 郎世宁

(The colours may appear a little faded, but her face is similar enough to my own skin tone that I don’t think it’s been deliberately altered.)

What is interesting is that another version of this painting exists. Because I don’t know the name of this other version, it’s been hard to find info on it, but all evidence seems to suggest that it’s a reproduction:

What is interesting to me is that not only is her face distinctly more European in this later version, she also appears less comfortable in her armour. Unfortunately, I have no idea when this reproduction was made, where it was found, or if the painter is from the Occident or Orient. Given the high level of accuracy in the rest of the reproduction, the altered face is probably not an accident.

[mod note]

WHOA.

The alt text for the first image here is : 香妃戎装像 — 郎世宁, which, according to google translate, says “Xiang Fei military uniform like - Castiglione”. The other one has just “香 妃”, “Xiang Fei”

I have never seen that copy. Wow. Wow.