Showing posts tagged art

dpicchiophotos:

I had my boyfriend who smokes use matches for a few days instead of a lighter and record the date and time and whatever he was thinking about while smoking. 
It’s funny that he quit smoking a few weeks after this project. 

dpicchiophotos:

I had my boyfriend who smokes use matches for a few days instead of a lighter and record the date and time and whatever he was thinking about while smoking. 

It’s funny that he quit smoking a few weeks after this project. 

mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info
mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info
mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info
mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info
mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info
mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶
Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇. 
Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.
Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).
Zoom Info

mingsonjia:

Beautiful Tuanshan 团扇 (Chinese Rigid/Fixed Fan; Pinyin: Tuán Shàn) by 霜天晓角李晶

Other names: 圆扇, 宫扇 or 纨扇.

Tuanshan is the oldest form of hand fan in Chinese history and one of the great treasures of traditional Chinese arts. Before folding fans (Zheshan) appeared, Tuanshan were greatly used. This type of Tuanshan which can date back to the Han Dynasty, uses silk as the covering can carry arts like paintings, calligraphy and embroideries on both sides and decorated by Chinese knots, jades or tassels.  It was popular among Chinese ladies as an accessory.

Tuanshan came in various shapes and forms (not like in the photo-set which are all round. But “Tuanshan” means “round fan” usually used as an umbrella term for all fixed fans), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, wood, feathers, plantain leaves etc.(before folding fan appeared, Chinese men usually use those made by other materials rather than silk). The best ones had a surface covered by white silk from East China’s Shandong Province while the handles were crafted out of bamboo from Central China’s Hunan Province. Embroideries from Jiangsu is the most popular in “The Four Great Chinese Embroideries” (Jiangsu, Hunan, Guangdong and Sichuan embroideries).

arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.
Zoom Info
arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.
Zoom Info
arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.
Zoom Info

arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007

Photo by Marc Domage

Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.